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Courses at OSU

There are currently 4 courses offered by PMRL at OSU.

ECE 3020: Introduction to Electronics

This course focuses on the fundamentals of electronics, including diode and transistor models for amplifiers, switches, and logic gates; Multiple transistor circuit analysis, small-signal analysis, op amps, and applications to electronic systems. This course is a 3-hour undergraduate level course, and is offered every semester.

ECE 5021: Analog Integrated Circuits

This course focuses on analog integrated circuits. This includes the physical structure of analog/mixed-signal integrated circuits and their layout, active and passive analog components in integrated circuits, current mirrors, single-ended and differential amplifiers, single and multi-stage Op-Amps and OTAs, frequency response and stability analysis, comparators and transconductors, and voltage and current reference circuits. The course includes a final project assignment where students are required to design and simulate (transistor-level) several analog building blocks in a standard CMOS technology using Cadence CAD tools.This course is a 3-hour graduate and senior undergraduate level course, and is offered every Fall semester.

ECE 5227: Fundamentals of Power Management Integrated Circuits for VLSI Systems

Developing power management solutions for low power mixed-signal VLSI applications require engineers with solid background in conventional power converter design, as well as mixed-signal design. On the one hand, power converters and regulators are covered in power electronics courses, but they focus mostly on high-power high-voltage applications with discrete components implementations. On the other hand, VLSI circuits courses rarely ever cover anything related to the implementation of power converters and regulators. As a result, there is a serious shortage in researchers and engineers who have the necessary background combination to develop efficient and cost-effective integrated power management solutions in VLSI systems. As this unique background combination is essential for a successful power management circuit and system design in modern Integrated Circuits, there is a desperate need in for formally-trained engineers in the area. To address this need at OSU, ECE 5227 has been introduced, where it focuses on the theory, design and applications of power management integrated circuits in VLSI systems. This includes: system and circuit architectures, performance metrics, practical implementations, design considerations in advanced CMOS processes, and design techniques for integrated linear/switching power regulators and battery chargers. The course includes a lab component where students are required to characterize various performance metrics of linear and switching power converters. There is also a final project assignment where students are required to design and simulate (transistor-level) a full buck converter or a linear regulator in a standard CMOS technology using Cadence CAD tools. This course is a 4-hour graduate and senior undergraduate level course, and is offered every Spring semester.

ECE 7027: Advanced Topics in Analog VLSI Design

This course focuses on dvanced topics in analog VLSI design, such as integrated data converters, power management integrated circuits, and high-performance high-speed analog circuits. This includes: system and circuit architectures, performance metrics, practical implementations, design considerations in advanced semiconductor processes, chip design projects, and lab characterization. The actual topics covered in the course will depend on the semester of offering. Currently, the focus of the course is the system and circuit level concepts associated with A/D and D/A  Nyquist-rate and oversampled (Delta-Sigma) data converters. Nyquist-rate A/D architectures covered include flash, two-step, pipelined, SAR, and integrating architectures. Nyquist-rate D/A architectures covered include resistor-string, binary-scaled, and thermometer-code architectures. Delta-Sigma A/D architectures covered include 2nd-order switched-C and continuous-time architectures. The course includes a lab component where students are required to characterize various performance metrics of SAR ADCs. There is also a final project assignment where students are required to design and simulate (transistor-level) a full 6-bit flash ADC in a standard CMOS technology using Cadence CAD tools. This course is a 4-hour graduate level course, and is offered in the Spring semester of odd years.